Genealogists Are “My Tribe”...

I recently saw a reference where a person was saying that they were part of a tribe. Not in the traditional sense of the the meaning tribe, but rather that they had an affiliation with a group of people with a common interest. Well if that’s the case, genealogists are “my tribe”. So what makes me say this? For one thing geniepeeps understand why we do what we do. Those in my tribe understand that you can get up (or still be up) at 2am and finally get that breakthrough with a record that you’ve been searching for for the past seven years. But of course you can’t wake the non-genies in the house to share your excitement, but you can shout it out loud on social media to your geniefriends around the world, and THEY TOTALLY UNDERSTAND. Fellow genealogists understand that a day out for a drive usually involves visiting a cemetery or two along the way. And that a holiday is normally planned around ancestral places you’d like to visit, or archives that may hold vital records relevant to your research. They understand the excitement that a certificate brings, and they understand when you get a day (or week) off, that that is RESEARCH TIME. Who cares about the housework, filing, getting the car serviced and so on, research comes first. But mostly I claim them as “my tribe” because they are my friends and mentors, who are helpful, inspiring and a very welcoming bunch of people. Wikipedia’s definition of tribe states: “A tribe is viewed, developmentally or historically, as a social group existing before the development of, or outside, states. A tribe is a group of distinct people, dependent on their land for their livelihood, who...

Updating …

Just a quick post to let you know that I have been working on things on the backend of my blog for the past few days. I would think that most of you wouldn’t have seen anything different, and that’s fine. Although some of you may have ended up with two emails the other day. Apologies for that. But it should be sorted out soon. I have been changing over from Feedburner to MailChimp. For those who subscribe by email, you don’t need to do anything as I’ve transferred your details over. Although at present I haven’t switched off the Feedburner one, so that’s why those you may have ended up with two copies of my post. However those who subscribe by using a blog reader (ie. Feedly, Inoreader or other similar ones) please note, my feed link has now changed, so you will nee to update the link to: www.lonetester.com/feed If you don’t update, when I disable my Feedburner link, you will no longer get notification of my posts. If you don’t already get my posts, but would like to, you can use the feed link above in your email reader, or you can subscribe by email by popping your details into the pop-up on the screen, or by entering your details in the subscribe box on the righthand side. Please bare with me for just a little longer while I finalise the crossover, just tinkering and making sure all is working as it should. And I do apologise in advance for anyone that ends up with two copies of my posts, it won’t be an ongoing thing forever. And hopefully all is good, and I’ll resume usual genealogy posts in the not too distant...

Just Testing

Test post. I’m just trialling new sign up and blog post sending out software.

Being Thankful

Thursday, 24th November 2016 … it’s Thanksgiving Day. Well it is in America anyway, as we don’t do ‘thanksgiving’ here in Australia. Still that doesn’t mean to say we can’t be (make that shouldn’t be) thankful. And I’m going to take a leaf out of The Legal Genealogists’s book and write down a few things that I’m thankful for. I am thankful for my family (afterall, they put up with me) I am thankful for my job (I work in a genealogy bookstore, so what’s not to love?) I love giving suggestions other researchers (when asked), and I see their excitement when they find new avenues to search I am thankful that Summer is nearly here I am thankful that our house survived the Sampson Flat bushfires I’m also REALLY thankful that the local wildlife (our kangaroos and koalas) survived, and still come to visit I totally love colours, so I love rainbows and bright sunsets, and always watch when I see them I am thankful that I have so many wonderful family and friends, near and far I am so thankful to the genealogy and geneablogger community. There’s so many wonderful, supportive people  who have now become wonderful friends I am thankful that I discovered blogging, otherwise I may not have ‘met’ so many of you I am also thankful that blogging allows me to tell the stories, recording them for others I’m thankful that Judy Webster introduced me to Kiva, so I can do a little to out help others I’m so, so thankful for Trove (I’m mean, who isn’t?) I’m thankful for the opportunity to travel to be able to see some of my ancestor’s homelands And I am TRULY, TRULY, TRULY thankful for my relatives...

25 Ways You Can Present and Share Your Family History...

Let’s say for instance that you’ve started your family history. In fact, you’ve probably been doing it a while. Possibly even years. So now you’ve got all this family information … why not do something useful and creative with it? I’m sure many of you will say ” but none of my family are interested”. I know, I’ve heard that many, many times. And my answer to that, is that it is then your job to MAKE THEM interested. Don’t just tell them the facts (the names and dates) or give them a huge pile of papers, their eyes will glaze over, and you will have put them off family history forever. So it’s a case of getting creative in HOW you present your family history. There are many, many different ways of ‘presenting’ and sharing your research, and it really comes down to whatever works for you. It might be with just your immediate family, or it might be with the whole world. It’s entirely up to you as to who you share it with, and how you share it. Here are 25 ideas on different ways you can present and share your family history. 1. BLOG Blogging is one of the easiest ways to be able to share your research with the world. It’s free, you can do it when you want to, and you can do it from home. You’ve done the research, so why not tell your family (and the wider world) the stories of your ancestors. Tell them about the goldrush, the war heroes, the Depression, the struggles, life on the land, migrating or moving house, the stories of family heirlooms, family pets etc. It’s all history, and you could tell it. It’s a...

Discovering Links: 15 FREE Links for Australian Genealogy and History...

Here’s another of my “Discovering Links” post. These posts consist of a collection of links that I have discovered, or found useful, and want to share with others. But rather than simply giving you a whole batch of random links each time, I am grouping them by Australian state, country or topic. You can see my previous Discovering Links posts here. For this one I’ve decided to share my Australian (meaning Australia-wide) links. It is not intended to be an exhaustive collection (not by a long shot), but they are simply ones that many will find useful, and it may include some that you may not have known about. And while many people think that genealogy costs a lot of money, let me tell you that all of the links below are free. Personally I find that it’s often a matter of knowing where to look beyond the big-name websites, and hopefully this will help with that. ======= MONUMENT AUSTRALIA Containing almost 30,000 monuments so far, the Monument Australia website is a site which records the “public monuments and memorials in all Australian States and Territories under various themes”.  Divided into conflict, culture, disaster, government, landscape, people and technology, you can search this site, and find transcriptions and photographs of most of the monuments listed. The work of volunteers, they are to be commended for their efforts. AUSTRALASIAN BDM EXCHANGE The Aus BDM Exhange site is a “free resource for genealogists to share information from Australian and New Zealand vital records”. If you have BDM records you can enter their details in so others can find them. And you can search to see if anyone has already entered details for those you are researching. Their stats show that currently the...

The Australian Expo 2016: Geneabloggers and Sore Feet!...

It’s been a few weeks since Unlock the Past’s Australian History & Genealogy Expo, so I apologise for the lateness of this, but I’ve been playing catch up ever since. Anyway back on October the 7th and 8th, I was involved with Unlock the Past’s Australian Expo. This was South Australia’s first major genealogy event for a number of years, and it was the biggest genealogy event in Australia for 2016. As part of the organising committee it meant I was up at crazy hours all week getting things ready, not to mention getting to the venue by 6am on Friday morning ready to start setting up. Held in the sports centre at Immanuel College, Novar Gardens, it was a good venue – not too far from the city, not too far from the beach, and quite a lot of parking onsite … and Adelaide even put on awesome weather just for the event (unlike the torrential downpours it had in the weeks leading up to it). As I was there as an exhibitor (on the Gould Genealogy/Unlock the Past stand) it meant that I didn’t get to go to any of the talks which is a shame as there were a heap of fabulous talks … and from reports from those who did go, found them awesome! But that’s the life of an exhibitor. Instead myself and co-workers were kept busy super on our stand. So as I can’t report on the the various talks, or event other exhibitors as unfortunately I barely saw them, I shall tell you about the geneabloggers. I did manage a 5 minute break at Saturday lunchtime, and we got as many of the geneabloggers there as we could for a group photo....

Halloween: Apples, Hazelnuts and Predicting the Future...

Halloween: it’s all pumpkins, ghosts, scary decorations, costumes and getting lollies for trick and treating right? Sadly it’s what it is nowadays, but certainly wasn’t what it used to be. How did Halloween get from predicting your future partner to door knocking for candy? I really don’t know. I’m not going to go into the LONG history of Halloween as you can find that on Wikipedia and elsewhere on the internet, but what I wanted to do was highlight a few of the past Halloween customs (or Hallowe’en as it’s written back then). In general terms it sounds like Halloween (aka All Hallows Eve) was a night of music, dancing and games. These are courtesy of the South Australian Weekly Chronicle dated 28 December 1867, on Trove. You can read the full article here. APPLE DUNKING I’m sure many of you are familiar with this one. I remember it from kid’s birthday parties. Apples are placed in large buckets of water, and you have to grab the apple, without using your hands – usually getting yourself and others around you quite wet in the process. I’m not sure what the significance of that for halloween was … but according to the article is was something of a custom. HANGING APPLE This one I’d not heard of before, and can’t quite envisage it … but I’m sure there were some injuries from it … HAZELNUTS Apparently many of the Halloween ‘customs’ were in relation to predicting your future partner, or how suited you were to your partner. Roasting hazelnuts is one such case. Intriguing, right? Which brings me back to the first question … how on earth did Halloween get to be from this to what it is today? I...