Planes, Trains and Automobiles … And a Big Ship As Well

Planes, Trains and Automobiles … And a Big Ship As Well

Planes, maybe a train, and no doubt buses and taxis, as well as a big ship are what I will be experiencing soon, as in a few days time I’ll be on my way to London to go on Unlock the Past’s 5th cruise. So the suitcase is out, the passport is packed, and so are my European plugs, and my Unlock the Past cruise t-shirts. The rest I need to work out this weekend!

This is Unlock the Past’s 5th history and genealogy cruise, and it will be first real international one, as all their previous cruises have left from either Australian or New Zealand ports. This one starts from London, then goes up to Scotland, around to Ireland, stops at the Islands, touches on France, and then heads back to London. So it’ll be quite a trip!

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Great Grandpa Winter and his Tattoos

Great Grandpa Winter and his Tattoos

I have written from time to time about  my great grandpa Winter (see the links below), and was inspired to do so again after reading an article today.

Although the article was about convicts their tattoos, it reminded me of Otto Winter’s tattoos which I found out about from his military records.

The image below is  portion of a page from Otto Winter’s WW1 records which are held at the National Archives of Australia – which lists his tattoos in his distinguishing marks.

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Was it More Than a Dream?

Was it More Than a Dream?

Dreams (the sleeping-type ones, not the wishful-thinking ones) are odd. You go to sleep, you enter a world where everything seems possible and makes sense – though it clearly doesn’t – but it sure does in that world – then you wake up, and for the most part forget about what it was you even dreamt about.

Dreams can make you happy, sad, scared or leave you feeling any number of other emotions. So yes, they are odd. However this post isn’t to tell you about dreams, but rather to tell you about one I had.

I have you intrigued don’t I. A dream on a genealogy related blog? How’s that work?

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My Adventures During South Australia’s History Month

My Adventures During South Australia’s History Month

It’s the end of June, and yet I still haven’t event reported on “HISTORY MONTH” yet. What can I say … life, work and writing for multiple blogs means that this one has taken a bit of backseat. So while it is belated, I still wanted to write my thoughts on the events that I went to during South Australia’s History Month.

So firstly just a bit about South Australia’s History Month (also known as the About Time History Festival). Originally it started out as History Week, but it grew to be History Month and it’s held every May, and this year there was a record number of events (555 all up) scheduled. For historians or genealogists it is a month to look forward to and immerse yourself in history. Though you most certainly have to be a history-nut to enjoy the events held.

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Planes, Trains and Automobiles … And a Big Ship As Well

Planes, Trains and Automobiles … And a Big Ship As Well

July 10, 2014 in All Posts, Britain, Events

Planes, maybe a train, and no doubt buses and taxis, as well as a big ship are what I will be experiencing soon, as in a few days time I’ll be on my way to London to go on Unlock the Past’s 5th cruise. So the suitcase is out, the passport is packed, and so are my European plugs, and my Unlock the Past cruise t-shirts. The rest I need to work out this weekend!

This is Unlock the Past’s 5th history and genealogy cruise, and it will be first real international one, as all their previous cruises have left from either Australian or New Zealand ports. This one starts from London, then goes up to Scotland, around to Ireland, stops at the Islands, touches on France, and then heads back to London. So it’ll be quite a trip!

Read more

Great Grandpa Winter and his Tattoos

Great Grandpa Winter and his Tattoos

July 7, 2014 in All Posts, Winter Family History

I have written from time to time about  my great grandpa Winter (see the links below), and was inspired to do so again after reading an article today.

Although the article was about convicts their tattoos, it reminded me of Otto Winter’s tattoos which I found out about from his military records.

The image below is  portion of a page from Otto Winter’s WW1 records which are held at the National Archives of Australia – which lists his tattoos in his distinguishing marks.

Read more

Was it More Than a Dream?

Was it More Than a Dream?

July 2, 2014 in All Posts, General

Dreams (the sleeping-type ones, not the wishful-thinking ones) are odd. You go to sleep, you enter a world where everything seems possible and makes sense – though it clearly doesn’t – but it sure does in that world – then you wake up, and for the most part forget about what it was you even dreamt about.

Dreams can make you happy, sad, scared or leave you feeling any number of other emotions. So yes, they are odd. However this post isn’t to tell you about dreams, but rather to tell you about one I had.

I have you intrigued don’t I. A dream on a genealogy related blog? How’s that work?

Read more

My Adventures During South Australia’s History Month

My Adventures During South Australia’s History Month

June 30, 2014 in All Posts, Australia, Events

It’s the end of June, and yet I still haven’t event reported on “HISTORY MONTH” yet. What can I say … life, work and writing for multiple blogs means that this one has taken a bit of backseat. So while it is belated, I still wanted to write my thoughts on the events that I went to during South Australia’s History Month.

So firstly just a bit about South Australia’s History Month (also known as the About Time History Festival). Originally it started out as History Week, but it grew to be History Month and it’s held every May, and this year there was a record number of events (555 all up) scheduled. For historians or genealogists it is a month to look forward to and immerse yourself in history. Though you most certainly have to be a history-nut to enjoy the events held.

Read more

Discovering Links: A Bunch of “General” Sites

Discovering Links: A Bunch of “General” Sites

June 16, 2014 in All Posts, Discovering Links, Reference

What do vintage adverts, old maps, stock photos, military acronyms and rescued heirlooms have in common? They have made it on to my second “Discovering Links” post.

It is these “General” links that I’ve decided to share with you. Why “General” you may ask? Well, simply because they are either about a topic as opposed to a place, or they don’t fit into any ‘one’ specific country category … so they get filed into general (well in my world they do anyway).

I hope you find the following links of interest.

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Want to Read a REAL Thriller? Then Read this Shipboard Diary …

Want to Read a REAL Thriller? Then Read this Shipboard Diary …

June 15, 2014 in All Posts, Australia, Products

The year is 1838, and James Bell a young man from Scotland has said goodbye to his family and the love of his life, and has made his way to Southampton to embark on the voyage of a lifetime. He was one of more than 90 passengers who boarded the “Planter” ship on 23 November 1838, all eager to reach their new homeland South Australia in a few short months.

Little did they know what was in store. And if it wasn’t for James Bell writing in his diary, we wouldn’t have known what would have happened on the one of the most adventurous, tragic, exciting, and exhausting voyages ever.

Sound intriguing? It is … Titled “A Journey To Australia: A Journal by James Bell“, the book is the diary of a guy who migrated to South Australia in 1839, and in my opinion it’s is just as exciting as any thriller book I’ve read. I would go as far to say that it is one of the most AMAZING books I’ve ever read in my life.

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150 Great South Australians – Part 2 J-Z

150 Great South Australians – Part 2 J-Z

June 10, 2014 in All Posts, Australia, Trove Tuesday

A little while ago I introduced you to the to 150 Great South Australians list that was originally published in The Advertiser. As it was WAAAAY too long to reproduce all in one post, I split it into two. If you missed the earlier post, you can find the A-I list here, with the J-Z list below.

This second list of “great South Aussies” which by the way you’ll be pleased to know includes women as well as men, contains inventors, businessmen, ministers, politicians, charity workers, doctors, manufacturers, educators, explorers and many, many more.

You’ll find that many are ‘pioneers’ in their field, because basically they were coming to a colony that was just developing, and was in need of expertise. So you’ll find that many of these people helped shape not just South Australia with their skills, but in some respects, Australia as well.

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New Series: Discovering Links … Scottish and the US to Start With

New Series: Discovering Links … Scottish and the US to Start With

June 5, 2014 in All Posts, Discovering Links, Scotland, United States

I’m not that keen on study. Never was. And probably never will be. At least not in the long-course-structure-type-learning-thing anyway. But I am continually learning, and expanding my genealogy knowledge because through all of my genealogy-related reading (such as genie magazines, blogs, as well the numerous social media sites), and even just chatting with customers in our store at Gould Genealogy I come across some fascinating websites and interesting info. While not all are relevant for my own research, I still find it interesting. But unfortunately they don’t ALL stay stuck in my head as they should (not enough UHU or blu-tac obviously), so I write them down.

I find writing them down is good, but to be useful I need to have access to my list of interesting links, as I don’t carry my

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Trove Tuesday: When the Plague Hit Australia

Trove Tuesday: When the Plague Hit Australia

May 21, 2014 in All Posts, Australia, Trove Tuesday

Everyone has heard of the bubonic plague, right? I’m sure you have. Anyway this was also commonly known as the “Black Death“, and for good reason. When it spread across Europe in the 14th century it killed at least 25 million people. That my friends, is more than the current-day entire population of Australia, which by the way is just over 23 million.

Anyway for someone who was infected and didn’t get any treatment, your chances weren’t great as the bubonic plague was said to kill about two thirds of humans within four days. So “HORRIFYING” is the word that comes to my mind.

So when it hit Australian shores in 1900 there was panic, which I would say is totally

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