So. Much. More. Research. To. Do!...

It is said that ‘genealogy never ends’. You get one generation back, then you suddenly double the number of people to research on the following one. Not to mention following the the siblings, and the side branches as well. So it’s true … it doesn’t. And anyone who says it does, should take part in this “Ancestor Tally” or “Ancestor Tracking” geneameme which I’ve seen on a few blogs now (Twisted Twigs on Gnarled Branches, and Michael Dyer’s Family Sleuther), so I thought I’d play along and see what my 15 or so years of on-off research shows. In short it shows that I need to spend a whole lot more time researching! So the idea is to count up the number of direct line ancestors you can identify going back10 generations (starting from yourself). So I sat down, printed out a 10 generation ancestral  chart (4 pages so it wasn’t too bad), counted them up generation by generation … and wallah … I have the numbers, which I then also converted to percentages. As you can see from the numbers I’m not doing too bad till I reach my the 7th generations (4x great grandparents). Part of that is probably due to the fact that I just haven’t entered some info (I really find the search more interesting than the entering, do others find that too?), but it does also highlight that a LOT more research is still to be done. It’ll happen bit-by-bit. Another name here, another date there, or something verified so I can add it in. We all know it’s a slow process. That’s just the way of proper genealogy.  GenerationRelationshipNo. in GenIdentified% TOTAL1023171 1Self11100% 2Parents22100% 3Grandparents44100% 4Great Grandparents88100% 52x Great Grandparents1616100% 63x Great Grandparents322681%...

The Top Hat, the Riot, and the £500 Fine...

On this day 220 years ago, 15 January 1797, something lifechanging happened. The world of fashion changed on that day. Top hats were created. Yes, that right. The fashion icon of the upperclass and gentry in the Edwardian and Victorian eras, and a must have accessory for anyone who’s into Steampunk style, was created. But not all went smoothly for the creator John Hetherington, as his newly designed head attire caused a riot. The condensed version of story is as follows … The first Top Hat was worn by haberdasher John Hetherington on 15 January 1797, in London, England. When Heatherington stepped from his shop at 11am wearing his unusual headgear, a crowd quickly gathered to stare. The gathering soon turned into a crowd crush as people pushed and shoved against each other, resulting in a broken arm for one person there. As a result, Hetherington was summoned to appear in court before the Lord Mayor and fined £500 for breaching the peace. He was also charged with appearing “on the public highway wearing a tall structure of shining lustre and calculated to terrify people, frighten horses and disturb the balance of society”. However, within a month, he was overwhelmed with orders for the new headwear. Trove has many articles detailing the “origin of the Top Hat”. Here’s a few of the longer versions of the story if you wish to check them out. – How the First Silk Hat Startled London, Launceston Examiner, 17 February 1899 – The First Silk Hat, Evening News Sydney, 25 February 1899 – The First Top Hat, Canberra Times, 10 June 1927 Personally I’m totally thankful to John Hetherington, as I’m a lover of the Victorian era style, and really LOVE top hats,...

UPDATE: Facebook for Australian History and Genealogy...

Since releasing my first big list of Australian Facebook links relating to history and genealogy back in September 2016, this list continues to grow. My first list contained 504 links in 20 pages, we have now have 833 links listed on 31 pages. There’s additions to nearly every category, and I’ve added one new category this time too (Individuals). You can download the latest list from the link below. DOWNLOAD HERE This is an ongoing list which will be updated periodically, so if you have any links you’d like added, please either send an email to  alona @ lonetester.com (without the spaces), or message me on my Lonetester page on Facebook. ————– And I can’t mention genealogy on Facebook without making reference to two other incredible lists: – Katherine Willson’s worldwide Genealogy on Facebook list is enormous, and now has over 10,000 links. – Gail Dever’s Facebook for Canadian Genealogy is a must for everyone with Canadian...

95, and What a Birthday it Was!!!...

Today’s Trove Tuesday post doesn’t really require much text from me, as the article is self-explanatory. The article below comes from the Australian Christian Commonwealth newspaper, and is dated Friday 2 September 1921. This article is about my 3x great grandma, Elizabeth Kelly (nee Gould) on her 95th birthday party. NINETY-FIVE AND ENJOYS A BIRTHDAY PARTY! A good old Methodist, in the person of Mrs. Elizabeth Kelly, celebrated her ninety-fifth birthday on Saturday, August 20. The members of her family gathered at Mr. Joseph Kelly’s home, Valmai Avenue, Clarence Park, to do her honour. During the afternoon numerous visitors called to pay their respect, amongst them being Mrs. Thyer, who is also ninety-five years of age and went to school with Mrs. Kelly at High Ham, Somersetshire, England. They met again some years later when both were young married women, and lived a few miles from each other at One Tree Hill. Mrs. Thyer moving to the Angaston district they lost sight of each other, and half a century later they meet again. It was interesting to note the pleasure with which they recalled incidents of their childhood days, and how solicitous they were for each other’s safety as they stepped off the verandah together. Mrs. Kelly came to South Australia, with her father, the late Joseph Gould, in the “Prince Regent,” September; 1839, at the age of thirteen. She remembers well the discomfits of the journey to town in a spring dray, the cramped accommodation of Emigration Square, and all the incidents attendant on setting up a home in a new and young country. Her father first took up land at Brown Hill Creek. Mr. Sleep, after whom Sleep’s Hill is named, used to conduct services in his...

RootsTech 2017!

Well there’s literally only a month to go until the biggest genealogy show on the planet hits Salt Lake City, Utah! Held yearly, RootsTech has become one of the “must-attend” genealogy events for many around the globe. Each February thousands of genealogists converge on Salt Lake City, to attend this four day event. Organised by FamilySearch, the number of attendees has been around25,000 for the past couple of years, but they are expecting over 30,000 in 2017. And this year I’ll be one of them. When: 8-11 February, 2017 Where:  the Salt Palace, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA I’ve booked my flights, my accommodation, and paid my registration to attend, and can’t wait. This will actually be my third RootsTech, having attended in 2013 and 2015. Both of them were a whole heap of fun mixed with a whole heap of exhaustion. But I’ve made so many new friends from around the world, and had the pleasure of meeting many of the big names in the genealogy industry as well. And I look forward to doing it all again. So now you have the When and Where, but what about the Why? So what’s so good about RootsTech? – Well for a start there are over 200 talks you can choose from, as well as workshop classes you can attend. – There are celebrities like LeVar Burton, Buddy ‘Cake Boss’ Valastro, and the Scott Brothers who will be there to talk about their stories. – There’s an absolutely enormous expo hall, filled with hundreds of exhibitors. – There’s the Innovator Summit and Showdown, which features the latest and greatest in the technology+genealogy field. – There is a Family Discovery Day, so bring along the whole family! – You can...

10 Inspiring Genealogists From 2016...

The year is almost over and as I’m not one for resolutions I’m not going to write about what I plan to do in 2017. And I’m also not going to write about what I ‘should’ have done this year either, but rather I’m writing about those who inspire me. Everyone has people they look up to and admire. Those whose talks you enjoy listening to, articles you read, or who give great advice,  and in essence – inspire you. So as the year comes to a close I’m taking a moment to look back and see who from the genealogy-world who inspired me throughout the year. Amy Johnson Crow – Amy Johnson Crow I’m a newbie follower of Amy’s, but I’m a total convert. Her blog posts are a pure learning experience, both in terms of content and in the presentation style. With her 31 Days to Better Genealogy, along with Top Tips, and 5 Sources… and so on, take a moment to check out her blog and see what you can learn from it. Cyndi Ingle – Cyndi’s List I am a regular user of Cyndi’s List, and as such I am always amazed at what I find on there, and that simply due to the hard work of Cyndi Ingle, who without her, Cyndi’s List wouldn’t even exist. Her dedication to keeping her site up to date with new links, and fixing broken ones, has made Cyndi’s List one of the top tools for any researcher around the world. And is a credit to her and her character. Helen V. Smith – From Helen V. Smith’s Keyboard With Helen’s knowledge and enthusiasm, how could anyone not be inspired? Despite being a fellow Aussie, I haven’t had...

180, and Still So Young!...

Happy Birthday South Australia! 28th of December. The day that my beautiful homestate celebrates its birthday, and today it turns 180. And while 180 is ancient in human terms, for the age of place it’s really only a baby. But even so, in those 180 years, the colony (and now State) has seen so many remarkable achievements throughout the years. But first South Australia’s birthday is officially called “Proclamation Day“, and Wikipedia says … “Proclamation Day in South Australia celebrates the establishment of government in South Australia as a British province. The proclamation was made by Captain John Hindmarsh beside The Old Gum Tree at the present-day suburb of Glenelg North on 28 December 1836.“ John Hindmarsh, who became the first governor of South Australia arrived in South Australia on the “Buffalo”, on 28th December 1836, and when he stepped ashore at Holdfast Bay (near the Old Gum Tree), he read the proclamation. Each year re-enactments of the events of South Australia’s founding are still held on the same day, by the remains of the same Old Gum Tree. The proclamation calls upon the colonists to “conduct themselves with order and quietness,” to be law-abiding citizens, to follow after industry, sobriety, and morality, and to observe the Christian religion. By so doing, they would prove to be worthy founders of a “great free colony.” You can read the full proclamation on the Adelaidia site. The People … As with any place, South Australia has many men and women of ‘note’. Those who’ve made an impact on the State  in various ways, and you’ll find many of these mentioned in the 150 Great South Australians post (see links below), but obviously the list is confined to 150, with others who...

Genealogy and the 52 Week Challenge...

Ok, who’s up for a Genealogy Challenge? I could say Blog Challenge, but this isn’t just for bloggers. It’s actually for anyone who wants to record their own history, and it allows you to do it a little each week.  And you don’t even have to do it online. Simply grab yourself a blank notebook, and you’re all ready to go! I recently came across Linda’s 52 Week Challenge, and I love it. Linda writes the Hinterland Writing blog, and she started this Challenge back in May 2016. Releasing a new topic each week, she’s currently up to Week 29. It’s along the lines of my Family History Through the Alphabet Challenge, as in you pick and choose which weeks you’d like to participate in. In saying that she has a number of dedicated followers who are busy recording their memories every week, with others doing some along the way. Anyway I’ve compiled a list of her topics for Weeks 1-29 for you. 52 Week Challenge Week 1 – What is your full name? Do you know why you were given that name? Do you have a baptismal name? A confirmation name? Why were these names chosen? Week 2 – When and where were you born?  Which child are you ? Brothers and sisters? Capture the memories of the house you grew up in and the neighbourhood as you saw it? What do you remember the most about the house? Week 3 – Your dad Week 4 – Name 5 people that you consider to have had a positive impact on the world Week 5 – Mother Week 6 – Occupations Week 7 – Have any of your immediate family members died? Week 8 – Brothers and sisters Week...