Then and Now: Phillips’ Fruit Exchange, Kadina...

Let me re-introduce you to George Phillips. I say re-introduce as I did blog about him and his family last year for one of my Alphabet posts. Anyway George is my great great great grandpa, and in this time I want to concentrate on George Phillips, the businessman. Born in Cornwall in 1845, in 1865 George together with his wife, new baby boy George jnr, and his wife’s parents set sail for Adelaide, South Australia to start a new life. Having grown up with his stepfather who was a miner back in Cornwall, it was only natural that after arriving at Port Adelaide in 1865, George and the family headed to the copper mines up at Moonta. It took them three days travelling by cart, but they got there. Anyway after 10 years of mining George got out of it for a reason we don’t yet know, so moved the family back to Adelaide and embarked on a new career and started up a fruit & veg business in Adelaide’s East End. Obviously the family liked the slower pace of country life in the Yorke Peninsula, as in 1888 the family returned to the area, this time to the neighbouring town of Kadina where George opened up the “Phillips’ Fruit Exchange” in Taylor Street, Kadina. Sadly George died only a few years after it was established, leaving his wife, Mary Ann and his older boys George jnr and Samuel to run it. George jnr grew the business and was exporting fruit & veg as well as confectionery to every state around Australia. The business remained in the Phillips family until it was closed in 1980, only eight years short of it’s century. Samuel Phillips who is in the pictures below...

Family History Through the Alphabet Challenge: X is for … Signatures...

After thinking about what to do for the letter X for weeks, I still hadn’t come up with anything. So the fact that this post has even happened is a tribute to Wendy who commented on the Gould Genealogy Facebook page for the Family History Through the Alphabet, the letter X, and gave me the idea for this post. X is for … Signatures Actually technically this post is about the lack of signature, as in those that were illiterate and used X for a signature (ie. X is the mark of _________ ) was the actual wording that was used on certificates.After getting the idea, it made me re-look at all the certificates I have to see how many signed, and how many put ‘X’ as their mark. Interestingly most of the certificates I have show that they were literate, or at least enough to sign their own signature. However amongst them, there are a some that do have X as their mark and I must say I was surprised at who. So here’s just a few of the examples of signatures using the letter X from my collection: So there’s a few of my X for signatures. Do you have many X signatures in your collection of...

Family History Through the Alphabet Challenge: P is for … Charlotte PHILLIPS...

Continuing to work our way through the Family History Through the Alphabet challenge, and we’ve made it to the letter P, and as intended right from near the beginning, I want to tell you about one of my favourite ancestors … Charlotte Phillips. P is for Charlotte Phillips Phillips is my maiden name, so naturally I have an interest in knowing just where I came from. Now you see this picture on the right, that’s Charlotte … ok, ok, no it’s not, but I’m saying it is  for now … at least until I get an actual picture of her. So no, I don’t have pics of my fav ancestor yet … but still let me tell you more about Charlotte Phillips, as she’s quite an amazing woman. Firstly she is my 4x great grandmother, and the mother of my emigrating Phillips family (her son George being the first of the clan to set foot on Australia’s soil – so that’s significant right?) Also, she not took her family over to the US to find a better life (and did so), she became an amazing businesswoman as well. But before I jump too far ahead here’s a little background info: Charlotte was born in 1822 Redruth, Cornwall to Eliza Phillips (yep, Charlotte was illegitimate). I don’t have much info on her prior to her having kids and getting married as there are 3 Charlotte Phillips’ in the various Census, none living with her mother, so it does make it hard to know just which one is ‘my’ Charlotte. But I have a feeling that the one that was a Servant could well just be her, but that is still yet to be proven. It appears that in her early...

Origins … Where Are You From?...

What are your origins? Where are you from? These are questions that are common amongst us genie-folk. And when asked, you know that they aren’t looking for the town where you grew up (well, not usually anyway), but rather where do your roots lie. My origins are mostly English, with a little Irish, a touch of European, and one branch from Finland … all of this heritage is what makes me, ME!! At our shop at work  (Gould Genealogy & History) we have had a big family tree chart of our family up on display. However since our move to a smaller shop in January this year it has remained rolled up, awaiting inspiration on just where we can actually fit it. Well this week, I moved some things around, and up went our family tree chart again. YAY! I must say that after not having seen the chart since January, it was very cool to see it again. And one thing that really struck me was the little map up the top which shows the “places of origin of our ancestors”, and noted just visually useful it is. So standing on a chair, I whipped out my trusty little Flip-Pal scanner (where  would I be without it?), and scanned the map so I could put it here, to show you just how cool adding family names to a map can make your family history. This chart (and map) were created by my dad quite a number of years ago, and while it doesn’t cover every line of my family (by a long way), it is still a great chart. In fact it mostly only follows a few lines on dad’s side of the family, so I’m thinking in all...

Family History Through the Alphabet Challenge: N is for … Never-Ending New Stuff and New Jersey...

As has happened numerous times throughout the Family History Through the Alphabet Challenge, I’ve changed my mind of what to write about after already starting this post. So for this N post I’d like to say that N is for NEVER-ENDING NEW STUFF We all know that the internet is an absolute wealth of information with new websites and new records being added online daily. Seriously the rate of growth is overwhelming. So how do we keep up with what new online that interests us? And by that I’m meaning anything genealogy or genealogy-related, but you knew that didn’t you … just checking!! Well there are several ways, so let me share those with you … Firstly you can keep up to date with what’s new on the big websites (arranged alphabetically: WEBSITES Ancestry.com.au – To check our the latest additions to the Ancestry website look for the Search button on their top bar, the scroll down to Card Catalogue.  That will bring u a listing of collections on the Ancestry.com.au website sorted by popularity. You can change this to sort by Newest, and on the lefthand sidebar you can choose to click off the “filter to show only records from Australia”and it will then give you all the latest records on any Ancestry site. Note: this also applies to Ancestry.co.uk and Ancestry.com. Cyndi’s List – Cyndi’s List is a directory of websites, not records, but I feel it is important to keep up with what websites are new too … so to view her newly added sites, she has a button titles “Browse New Links” and from there you can check the links added each day for the past month of so. FamilySearch – To view what’s new...

Family History Through the Alphabet Challenge: F is for Finland and Football...

This week’s letter in the ‘Family History Through the Alphabet’ Challenge is F … and immediately I thought of FINLAND, and then FOOTBALL. And as I couldn’t decide between them, I have decided to do both. F is for FINLAND I’ve written before about my Great Grandpa Otto Winter, who was born in Finland, and jumped ship in Australia – so I won’t repeat it here. Even though I’m only 1/8th Finnish, I have taken a real interest in my Finnish heritage – maybe because it is something completely different from Australian and English research? Who knows. First up let me tell you that this tiny country, which is way, way up near the top of the northern hemisphere has been such an interesting one to learn about. I won’t go into details about everything I have learned, but I will start off by showing you the size of Finland in relation to Australia. It’s only about 1/2 the size of South Australia. Anyway researching my Finnish heritage has led me to join a Family History Group or “sukuseura” as it is called in Finnish, and to discover and keep in contact with some reli’s from over there, which is simply awesome. Another big plus for Finland, is the Helsinki City Archives, who I must say are simply THE BEST!! I wrote to them asking if they happened to have any records relating to ‘Otto Winter’ and crossed my fingers hoping for something. Little did I expect what I got – which was fat a A4 size envelope packed with photocopies of all sorts. And by all sorts I mean all sorts … plans of the houses that Otto grew up in, an old map of the city of...

Family History Through the Alphabet Challenge: E is for Emigrant Ancestors...

I’m having fun in this ‘Family History Through the Alphabet Challenge‘, and from what I’ve seen from the other bloggers, they are too. For ‘E’ I thought of writing about various families that start with ‘E’, but instead I came up with another option.  Phillips is my maiden name, so I have always had a soft spot for knowing my direct line history, and George PHILLIPS is one of my emigrant ancestors, so I thought I’d tell you a little about him and his family. E is for Emigrant Ancestors Let me introduce you to my 3x great grandpa, George Phillips and his family. George Snr (as I call him, and is who is pictured on the right) was born in Redruth, in County Cornwall, England in 1845. At age 19 he  married Mary Ann Kemp who was born in Lamorran, also in Cornwall (she’s pictured on the right too). Their first child George Jnr, was born in May 1865, and just two months later the small family said farewell to their families, and embarked on a new chapter of their lives, emigrating to South Australia on the ship ‘Adamant’. Living for three months on a ship wouldn’t have been easy for anyone, let alone being new parents with a baby. But I imagine the conditions in England at that time would have been equally tough, so emigrating was seen as an opportunity for a better life. They survived the arduous trip, and the family first set up house in Moonta in heart of South Australia’s Little Copper Triangle.This makes sense as George Snr’s occupation on his marriage certificate was a miner – and the Copper Coast region of South Australia was well known for it’s copper mining. Seven...