150 Great South Australians – Part 2 J-Z...

A little while ago I introduced you to the to 150 Great South Australians list that was originally published in The Advertiser. As it was WAAAAY too long to reproduce all in one post, I split it into two. If you missed the earlier post, you can find the A-I list here, with the J-Z list below. This second list of “great South Aussies” which by the way you’ll be pleased to know includes women as well as men, contains inventors, businessmen, ministers, politicians, charity workers, doctors, manufacturers, educators, explorers and many, many more. You’ll find that many are ‘pioneers’ in their field, because basically they were coming to a colony that was just developing, and was in need of expertise. So you’ll find that many of these people helped shape not just South Australia with their skills, but in some respects, Australia as well. ————————————————————— Roland Ellis Jacobs (1891-1981) Businessman and philanthropist For nearly 20 years Roland was the managing director and chairman of the SA Brewing Company and worked widely for charities and the arts. Jimmy James (1913-1991) Aboriginal police tracker Born as a waterhole near Ernabella, James was a vigorous worker for Aboriginal rights and became a talented tracker for the South Australian police, assisting in the infamous Sundown and Pine Valley murder cases. August Ludwig Christian Kavel (1798-1860) Lutheran migrant leader One of the first Lutherans persecuted in Germany to resettle in South Australia, where he led the establishment of strong Lutheran communities in the Adelaide Hills and the Barossa Valley. Sidney Kidman (1857-1935) Pastoralist and philanthropist Kidman established transport and cattle interests in the north of South Australia and eventually became Australia’s biggest landholder with holdings stretching through Queensland, Northern Territory and South Australia....

Trove Tuesday: When the Plague Hit Australia...

Everyone has heard of the bubonic plague, right? I’m sure you have. Anyway this was also commonly known as the “Black Death“, and for good reason. When it spread across Europe in the 14th century it killed at least 25 million people. That my friends, is more than the current-day entire population of Australia, which by the way is just over 23 million. Anyway for someone who was infected and didn’t get any treatment, your chances weren’t great as the bubonic plague was said to kill about two thirds of humans within four days. So “HORRIFYING” is the word that comes to my mind. So when it hit Australian shores in 1900 there was panic, which I would say is totally understandable. And I would say would be much like today’s reaction, though obviously with less social media, and far less news hype. As it was back in the day they reported things as they were. Anyway my reason to this topic, is that while browsing around on Trove I found the following article in the Sydney newspaper ‘The Chronicle’, from 1900. And I must say the word Plague and Excitement aren’t two words I’d ever expect to be in the same sentence, there they are. But honestly I think they shouldn’t be, but that’s just me! The above image shows about half of the article, so if you’d like to read the full article, click on the link in the caption. And after finding this particular article, of course I went searching further. So on the Trove search screen I typed in bubonic plague, then narrowed it down to the year 1900,  and it gave me 14,057 results. And while I didn’t read every single entry I can...

150 Great South Australians – Part 1 A-I...

What defines a “great” South Australian? Well, I believe it to be someone (man or woman) who has not only done something exceptional within the community, but also someone that has potentially changed the way things are done. I came across a newspaper article in The Advertiser dated 12 July 2008, titled “150 Great South Australians”, which was a compilation by a group of senior writers of who they believe has earned the title of “Great South Australian”. The criteria was simple: to be eligible the person must have either been born in South Australia or had “contributed in some way to the promotion of South Australia”. It was no easy task and with the list far longer than the 150 names, it ended up being tough on who to actually leave out. Because listing all 150 names in a single list would make it ridiculously long, I have decided to make it a two-parter post. With the first 75 names covering A-I, and the second being J-Z. You’ll see that each person has their full name, date or birth and date of death (if relevant) listed as well as a brief line or two on why they made the list. Each is hyperlinked to where you’ll find more details about the person. Have a read through the list, and see how many names you recognise! George Fife Angas (1789-1879) Merchant, banker, philanthropist Was a major landholder in the early colony of South Australia, chairman of the South Australian Company and started the SA Banking Company, later the Bank of SA. George French Angas (1822-1886) Naturalist and artist Son of George Fife Angus, he made an international reputation as a painter, with much of his work involving South Australian...

Trove Tuesday: Death of an Old Colonist...

Following on from yesterday’s post that I wrote about William Beavis Randell who founded Gumeracha, is his obituary that I found in the South Australian Register on Trove. I actually found this article last week, but felt that I needed to introduce him before his giving details of his death, so I decided to make this a Trove Tuesday post. And because I know the newspaper text isn’t the most readable, even blown up in the pic above, here it is transcribed … DEATH OF AN OLD COLONIST. — Mr. W. B. Randell, of Gumeracha, who had been ill for some days, died on the evening of December 28 at his residence, Kenton Park. Gumeracha. Mr. Randell, who was born near Exeter, in Devonshire, was a very old colonist, having come out to South Australia by the Hartley, which arrived in October, 1837. Prior to leaving England he carried on a milling business, and came out to the colony under engagement to the South Australian Company. He was engaged in looking after the sheep, cattle, and land of the Company, and during the latter portion of his service was employed in discovering and selecting land for the Company. The Company’s Mill on the Torrens was built under bis directions. The land on which Gumeracha stands was formerly bis, and had been selected by him when in the Company’s service. Mr. Randell sold portions of it to form the township. He built two mills — one at Gumeracha and the other at Blumberg — the latter of which is now owned by one of his sons. His life latterly has been spent in improving his estate at Gumeracha, which is an exceedingly beautiful and valuable property. He built a chapel...

Trove Tuesday: Deaths of South Australian Pioneers...

Trove has done it again!! Yes, truly. It has managed to come up with the most awesomest of articles. And I know you’ll believe me when I say that when I saw this one, I said “that’s a Trove Tuesday” post for sure! So what’s all my excitement about? Well, if you have family who arrived in South Australia from the 1820s through until the 1860s, be sure to check the “Pioneers of South Australia” articles on Trove. This series of articles lists details of early immigrants to South Australia. Apart from the hundreds of names each list contains, you’ll also find their date of arrival, often the name of the ship, and either the date they died, or their age at death. Great stuff eh? So here’s the four articles I’ve found, each covers many columns, and is a great record of South Australian pioneers. 8 July 1925 – When the State Was Young: Some of its Pioneers http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article46220249 21 July 1927 – When the State Was Young: Some of the Pioneers Part II http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43594448 3 December 1928 – Passing Pioneers: Early Colonists Dying Out http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article35307667 30 December 1929 – Pioneers of the State: Early Colonists’ Roll Depleted http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29000247 So there you go. Newspapers aren’t just for BDM records, obits and news stories … they also often list pioneers too. In fact when I was relooking for this article (as I hadn’t tagged it at the time – I have now!), I searched for South Australian pioneer and came up with a HEAP of entries … some of which will no doubt make it into future Trove Tuesday posts....

Trove Tuesday: 1 March 1954, The Day the Earth Shook South Australia...

This post is about earthquakes, but let me start off by saying that South Australia is not known for its quakes. In fact it is more known for the lack of quakes, which is why it is big news if we have one. Yesterday was one of those rare days when South Australia (well parts of it) shook. I found this when I was driving home from work and heard it on the news. The report said that South Australia had had two small earthquakes (see the picture below). Remember I said we don’t get them here, so even the small ones make news! Anyway I did my usual weekday routine of getting up and off to work, then busy, busy all day. And I can confirm that I wasn’t one of the ‘hundreds’ who claim to have heard or felt the earthquakes, so I can’t say what it would be like, and don’t particularly want to go through one. Now going back a few years to when I was eight years old, my family moved into the “Springvale” property at Gumeracha in the Adelaide Hills. This is an old house, dating back to pre-1900. And from the day I moved in, till when I left, I felt the walls in my room would collapse whenever there was a big storm as there were huge cracks in the walls, which I was told was from the 1954 earthquake. Having known nothing of the ’54 earthquake as it was way before my time, I headed over to Trove, and found some amazing articles. Here’s the first one I found. It is a LOOOOONG article, so I’ve only copied a small portion of the beginning of the article here. For the...

Trove Tuesday: Christmas is the Season for Giving...

‘Tis the night before Christmas, and all through the house, not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse (or our cats). I’m not going to quote Christmas rhymes here, but I but it is Christmas Eve and all it quiet in our house at the moment. The cats are all sleeping, Mr Lonetester has gone to visit friends, so I’m home. And as there’s nothing decent on TV, I headed over to the Trove newspapers to see what I could find. Now I think most of you would agree with me that commercialism is ruining Christmas. For the past month or two we’ve had to deal with the glitzy TV adverts and the glossy brochures that arrive in the letterbox, each wanting us to buy the latest electric toothbrush, blower vac, or set of $2000 earrings for your loved one. And don’t forget that you must have matching tablecloth and napkins! I mean … really? Anyway while Troving I thought I’d see what is mentioned for Christmas in the tiny Adelaide Hills town of Cudlee Creek. Why there? Well this is the town I first lived in, prior to moving to Gumeracha. It was the town that my Kelly ancestors first settled, and it’s the town my Hannaford reli’s still live in. So my family has a close connection to the area. As always Trove comes up with the most remarkable articles, and I wanted to share one that highlights the generosity some people. Now in case you’re wondering why Mr Redden was donating to the Food for Britain Fund, it seems that at that time Britain was still on rations, and in desperate need of food. You can find a long article about the Food for Britain...

An Ode to Moustaches for Movember...

November has come to be recognised as Movember. The month for men (hopefully only men) to grow a mo, get sponsored by friends and family and raise money and awareness for men’s health, and of course “grow a mo”. Ok, ok I know I should have written this at the beginning of November rather than a few days from the end … but hey I’m still writing it … and it IS still November … just ;-). So November is the month for moustaches, so why not head over to one of my all-time fav websites … yes, Trove to see what was written about them back then. So here’s a collection of the interesting tid-bits I found. You know in browsing through all the articles on Trove, I can see that moustaches went in and out of fashion. I can see that there was a whole industry relating to the care and maintenance and style of your mo. And speaking of syles … there was a whole range of them. Anyway this whole post is not just about showing you men’s facial hair over the decades, but also as a reminder that Movember is still on for a few more days. And if you haven’t already supported the cause, you can do so through the Movember website. But if you wish to do something a little different, why not try this. Did you have have any ancestor/s who had mo’s (big or small ones – the mo’s not the ancestors hehe). If you happen to have a photo of them, dig it out, scan it, and pop it up on the Hairy Mancestors Facebook page. They are donating $0.50 for every pic of a ‘mo’d up ancestor’ that...

Trove Tuesday: Don’t Drink and Drive (even in 1885)...

There’s enough crazy drivers on our road these days, let alone those that drink as well, but it would seem that it is not entirely new. When browsing around on Trove I came across this article in the South Australian Weekly Chronicle, Saturday, 19 December 1885: FATAL ACCIDENT AT GUMERACHA Gumeracha, December 16. Joseph Dugmore, a man in the employ of Mr. Rehn, of Houghton, was run over by a waggon loaded with hay near here this evening and killed. He leaves a widow and six children. No one but the driver of the waggon witnessed the accident. An inquest will be held tomorrow. Now it’s not good to hear of anyone having an accident, let alone dying as well. And even harder when you realise that this happened just a few days before Christmas. But there is actually a whole lot more to the story than this article tells. So thanks to other articles we find out a little more from the article in the South Australian Register, Friday, 18 December 1885 FATAL ACCIDENT THROUGH DRINK. [By Telegraph.] Gumeracha, December 17. An inquest was held at the Courthouse to-day by Mr. W. Hicks, J.P., to enquire into the death of Joseph Dugmore. A number of witnesses were examined, whose evidence pointed to fact that deceased   had been drinking heavily during the day, and had colonial wine with him when he was killed. The only person near when the accident occurred was the driver of the team, who says that he and deceased were walking together at the near side of the team, when deceased went behind to look at the load. The driver proceeded on for about 150 yards, when on looking back he saw deceased lying...

Trove Tuesday: Rain, Football and the Police...

Trove Tuesday is here yet again. First up for those who many be new to my blog, here’s a super quick explanation of what Trove Tuesday is. Here in Australia we have the most wonderful resource in the world called “Trove”, created by the National Library of Australia. This is home to millions of records which are being put online, part of which is the historical digitised newspapers. As a way of showcasing what they have, and telling the world of our wonderful finds, Amy from the Branches Leaves and Pollen blog started doing Trove Tuesday, and since then Aussie geneabloggers have made embraced it and Tuesday has simply become Trove Tuesday. Now on to my story about rain, football and the police. Saturday 28th August 1926 was an exciting day for many, including my great uncle, Uncle Pete. In 1926 he was 12 years old, living at ‘Salem Glen’ at Gumeracha, and loved his football. August the 28th was the grand final for the local country football league, and it was being held between Woodside and Tweedvale (now known as Lobethal). Through both my Uncle Pete’s diary entry and the report of the game in The Register newspaper, we have a bit more of an idea on how the game went. I find it interesting that both sources have information that the other doesn’t, so to be able to use them in conjunction with one another to create more of a picture of the event is very useful. And just as a side note: Anyone can use Trove. It’s online. It’s free. And you’ll find everything there....