180, and Still So Young!

180, and Still So Young!

Happy Birthday South Australia! 28th of December. The day that my beautiful homestate celebrates its birthday, and today it turns 180.

And while 180 is ancient in human terms, for the age of place it’s really only a baby. But even so, in those 180 years, the colony (and now State) has seen so many remarkable achievements throughout the years.

But first South Australia’s birthday is officially called “Proclamation Day“, and Wikipedia says …

Proclamation Day in South Australia celebrates the establishment of government in South Australia as a British province. The proclamation was made by Captain John Hindmarsh beside The Old Gum Tree at the present-day suburb of Glenelg North on 28 December 1836.

the Old Gum Tree at Holdfast Bay (now Glenelg),, c1890

the Old Gum Tree at Holdfast Bay (now Glenelg), c1890

the Old Gum Tree at Glenelg, 2011

the Old Gum Tree at Glenelg, 2011

John Hindmarsh, who became the first governor of South Australia arrived in South Australia on the “Buffalo”, on 28th December 1836, and when he stepped ashore at Holdfast Bay (near the Old Gum Tree), he read the proclamation.

Each year re-enactments of the events of South Australia’s founding are still held on the same day, by the remains of the same Old Gum Tree. The proclamation calls upon the colonists to “conduct themselves with order and quietness,” to be law-abiding citizens, to follow after industry, sobriety, and morality, and to observe the Christian religion. By so doing, they would prove to be worthy founders of a “great free colony.” You can read the full proclamation on the Adelaidia site.

The People …
As with any place, South Australia has many men and women of ‘note’. Those who’ve made an impact on the State  in various ways, and you’ll find many of these mentioned in the 150 Great South Australians post (see links below), but obviously the list is confined to 150, with others who should make the list as well, but their achievements are incredible.

150 Great South Australians – Part 1 A-I
150 Great South Australians – Part 2 J-Z

The Events …
As for key events that have happened in South Australia, there’s so many … but here’s a small sampling for you.
1627 – First recorded European sighting of the South Australian coast.
1802 – South Australian coastline mapped by Matthew Flinders and Nicolas Baudin.
1836 – South Australia proclaimed by Governor John Hindmarsh on 28 December at the Old Gum Tree, Glenelg.
1836 – Site for Adelaide chosen by Colonel William Light beside the River Torrens.
1837 – Adelaide’s first hospital opens on North Terrace.
1838 – The first Australian police force is formed in Adelaide, the South Australia Police.
1839 – The first road in South Australia, Port Road, is opened.
1840 – Royal Adelaide Show held for the first time.
1848 – Pulteney Grammar School established.
1850 – The forerunner to Harris Scarfe, G. P. Harris and J. C. Lanyon, opened on Hindley Street.
1858 – Melbourne-Adelaide telegraph line opened.
1858 – The first edition of The Advertiser newspaper is published.
1859 – A jetty of more than 350 metres in length is constructed at Glenelg.
1861 – East Terrace markets opened.
1861 – Copper discovered at Moonta, on the Yorke Peninsula.
1865 – Bank of Adelaide founded.
1870 – Port Adelaide Football Club established.
1872 – The General Post Office opened.
1873 – First cricket match played at Adelaide Oval.
1878 – First horse-drawn trams in Australia commenced operations in the city.
1880 – Telephone introduced in South Australia.
1881 – Coopers Brewery is established.
1883 – Adelaide Zoological Gardens opened.
1885 – The Adelaide Arcade opens.
1895 – South Australia was the first Australian colony to grant women the right to vote, and the first in the world to allow women to stand for Parliament.
1901 – Adelaide became a state capital upon the establishment of the Commonwealth of Australia on 1 January.
1904 – Adelaide Fruit and Produce Exchange opens in the East End.
1914 – South Australian troops join their Australian comrades in Europe to fight in the Great War.
1915 – Liquor bars close at 6 pm following referendum, creating the six o’clock swill
1924 – Radio broadcasting begins.
1927 – Duke and Duchess of York visit.
1933 – First John Martin’s Christmas Pageant.
1935 – Many German place names, which had been changed during the Great War, are restored.
1937 – First permanent traffic signals installed.
1939 – Worst heat wave recorded with disastrous bushfires and highest Adelaide temperature of 47.6° Celsius.
1940 – Birkenhead Bridge opens.
1942 – Rationing of tea and clothing introduced.
1948 – Holden begins production.
1954 – Adelaide is hit by an earthquake causing much property damage but no loss of life.
1954 – Queen Elizabeth II makes first sovereign visit to Adelaide.
1954 – Mannum-Adelaide pipeline completed, pumping water from the River Murray to metropolitan reservoirs.
1955 – Adelaide Airport at West Beach opens.
1958 – First parking meters installed.
1977 – Late night shopping commences.
1982 – International air services begin at Adelaide Airport.
1989 – The Bicentennial Conservatory, referred to as “The Big Pasty”, opens at the Botanic Gardens.

More Information …
For further information on South Australia’s history, be sure to check out the following:
Wikipedia Timeline of South Australia’s history
South Australia’s Timeline: The First Hundred Years of Colonisation

 

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2 Responses to “180, and Still So Young!”

  1. crissouli says:

    I have included your blog in Interesting Blogs at

    http://thatmomentintime-crissouli.blogspot.com.au/2016/12/friday-fossicking-30th-dec-2016.html

    Thank you, Chris

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