Finding Hidden Gems!

Finding Hidden Gems!

The fact that my family has always been hoarders (well, my mum’s side of the family anyway), is a good thing, as it means there are so many documents, artifacts, photographs and other memorabilia that has been preserved, so I’ve started documenting these over on my other blog at Memorabilia House. But this post isn’t here to tell you all about that … well not exactly. It’s about the “hidden gems” that I have been finding as I’ve been documenting the items. And in this case I’m referring to what been finding in old bibles.

Our family has a LOT of old bibles around the place. But since my reli’s were a religious bunch, as some were ministers, and others founded churches, and donated land for churches I guess it’s not really surprising.

What I have found surprising, and absolutely astonishing, not to mention super exciting is finding out who these bibles actually belonged to, who they came from, and the story behind them, as well as other bits and pieces in the middle of them.

1. Sarah Hannaford (nee Stanger)
This bible was given to Sarah from her daughter Mary Eliza. Dated 1869. It contains an inscription of who it was to and from, with a date, as well as names and birth dates of other Hannaford relatives that have been written in, and a piece of well-used blotting paper.
For more about this bible => http://www.memorabiliahouse.com/2013/08/in-memory-of-susannah/

inscription in old bible

2.  Eva McCullough (nee Richardson)
This bible was given to Eva by her husband Rev. Robert McCullough on their wedding day, and I know this thanks to the inscription. Dated 1881
For more about this bible => http://www.memorabiliahouse.com/2013/07/my-own-eva/

old bible

3. Phebe Randell (nee Robbins)
this bible belonged to Phebe Randell (nee Robbins). It is undated but would have been between 1876-1919. This bible contains her name, together with a quote, as well as a heap of family members death (and one birth) details. Also contains various bookmarks, and other small cards slotted in throughout.
For more about this bible => http://www.memorabiliahouse.com/2013/07/the-family-recorder/

old bible
4. Phebe Randell (nee Robbins)
Another bible of Phebe’s, and this one was given to her by the Salem Baptist Sunday School (at Gumeracha, South Australia), in appreciation for her services. Dated 1908, thanks to the inscription,  know not only who this bible belonged to, but also who gave it and the WHY and WHEN!
For more about this bible => http://www.memorabiliahouse.com/2013/07/a-gift-to-great-great-grandma/

old bible

 

So from what looked simply like a pile of old books sitting on the shelf, these have turned out the be TRUE GOLD, and I haven’t even finished going through them all yet. But those that I have, have given me more of an insight into the people they were given to, those who gave them, and the reason behind the gift. Not to mention giving me names of family I didn’t even know about. Now THAT was EXCITING!

So I know for a fact that at least in my case, I need to page through each old bible (actually maybe any old books, I don’t trust my reli’s to stick to just bibles). So in time, we’ll see what others gems I find!

 

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4 Responses to “Finding Hidden Gems!”

  1. Catherine says:

    WONDERFUL!!! … lucky you Alona. 😀

    However, I can’t complain because I do have my mum’s “Birthday Book” and in there she has recorded her feelings, as the years progressed, re: the early death of her mum, etc. It was given to her by her Grandmother and provides the only example known of my Great Grandmother’s writing…

    I enjoyed this post very much Alona and it alerted me to the fact that later descendants are unlikely to recognise the changes to my mother’s handwriting, over the years, as well as the entries written by people like me unless I take the time to record this knowledge. Thanks again.

  2. That’s an amazing collection. I wish my ancestors were hoarders not heathens.

    • Alona says:

      Yes, it’s definately a case of hoarding is a good thing. Just wish more of my reli’s did, but still one branch of my family is better than none, so I’m not complaining. And I’m MOST thankful for the inscriptions, as without them they would mean nothing.

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