On the 11th hour, of the 11th day, of the 11th month …...

For Remembrance Day this year I wanted to share with you a couple of pages from what is known as the “Kelly Diary”. And I am eternally grateful to not only have a copy of this diary, but also that the current keeper of this treasure has kindly allowed me to reproduce these pages here. But first of, let me start by saying, no, these are not descendants from the Ned Kelly line in Ireland, but rather those from the Isle of Man. Or should I say the line of William Kelly born near Ramsey, Isle of Man in 1804 to be a tad more specific – since the Kelly name is like Smith in the region. The ‘diary’, and I write it in quotes because it is not strictly a diary, was written by Elise Marcia Kelly of Joslin in South Australia in late 1938. In this 34 page booklet she not only writes the lineage history from William Kelly (born 1804), together with information on the big 100 year reunion that was held in 1938, but also details of those who were involved in World War 1. And it is these pages I am sharing with you today.   On the 11th hour, of the 11th day, of the 11th month … WE WILL REMEMBER...

20 Remembrance Day Facts...

On the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, We will remember them. On this day we take time to remember, reflect and honour those who fought and died in war. Here are just a few facts for you to think about that relate to Remembrance Day. How it began … Remembrance Day is observed on 11 November to commemorate the official end of World War I. Remembrance Day ceremonies are held around the Commonwealth to remember the sacrifices made by all men and women who have fought and died in war. The war officially ended “at the 11th hour (11am) of the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918, when the Germans signed the Armistice Agreement. Remembrance Day was first observed in 1919 throughout the British Commonwealth thanks to King George V declaring the anniversary of the signing to be dedicated to a solemn observance of the men and women who gave their life during the conflict. The first official Armistice Day was subsequently held on the grounds of Buckingham Palace the following morning. The name variants … It was originally called “Armistice Day”. After the end of the Second World War, the Australian and British governments changed the name to Remembrance Day. Armistice Day was no longer an appropriate title for a day which would commemorate all war dead. Remembrance Day is also known as Poppy Day. The United States used to commemorate Armistice Day on November 11. However, in 1954 they changed the name to Veterans Day. The meaning behind the Poppy … The red poppy is the symbol of Remembrance Day and symbolises the bloodshed. The tradition of pinning a blood-red poppy to one’s lapel for the duration of Remembrance Day...

Remembrance Day: William Harry Green – Orchardist, Family Man, Soldier...

William Harry Green (1878-1915) was born at Kidderminster, Worcestershire, England and emigrated with his parents William and Fanny Green (nee Haycock)  and siblings Frank, Bert and Ida aboard the “Australasian” when he was 6 years old. The family settled in Gumeracha, a small town in the Adelaide Hills, in South Australia with Will attending the Gumeracha Primary School for a time, before transferring to the Blumberg (now Birdwood) School, and completing his schooling in 1892 age 13. Will married Anne Duthie in 1904 and at this time his occupation was listed as gardener at Gumeracha. The Green family lived at ”Springvale” at Gumeracha and were orchardists and beekeepers. This property had two houses on it, and Will, Annie and his four young daughters lived in the top house, with his parents William and Fanny living in the bottom one. Will enlisted with the Australian Army in October 1914, and was assigned to the 9th Light Horse Regiment. This regiment was formed in Adelaide and trained in Melbourne between October 1914 and February 1915, with about 3/4 of the regiment coming from South Australia and the other quarter from Victoria. As part of the 3rd Light Horse Brigade, it sailed from Melbourne on 11 February and arrived in Egypt on 14 March 1915. The Australian War Memorial states that the “light horse were considered unsuitable for the initial operations at Gallipoli, but were subsequently deployed without their horses. The 3rd Light Horse Brigade landed in late May 1915 and was attached to the New Zealand and Australian Division. The 9th was fortunate to be the reserve regiment for the Brigade’s disastrous attack on the Nek on 7 August, but subsequently suffered 50 per cent casualties attacking Hill 60 on 27...

Remembrance Day: Sixty Five Letters...

Sixty five letters … that’s is how many letters my grandma wrote to her husband while he was fighting overseas in WW2. How do I know this? Well, sadly I don’t have the letters, but I do have her diaries which lists the date of every letter she wrote to him over a period of 14 months. During the past few months I’ve been slowly going through our family heirlooms. Photographing, documenting them, and preserving them etc., and I have recently made my way on to Evelyn Hannaford’s (nee Randell) diaries … (aka my maternal grandma). I must say our family is fortunate that she was a diarykeeper, as we have 49 diaries covering a 61 year period. I can’t say I’ve read many of them yet, but two of these years 1942 and 1943 are what have intrigued me, as in the back each, grandma noted the date of every letter she wrote to my grandpa while he was in the Middle East fighting in WW2. Now it’s Remembrance Day next week on November the 11th which marks the anniversary of the armistice which ended the First World War. For this Australians observe one minute of silence at 11am on the 11th of November, “in memory of those who died or suffered in all wars and armed conflicts”. So while this isn’t actually about a relative who died or was wounded, it is still a post about my military heritage. Remembrance Day and Anzac Day both make people think deeply about their ancestors. Those who fought in the many wars. Some died, some were wounded, some came back … all fought for their country. But not forgetting the families back home taking on tasks to make ends meet,...