Heaven in a Bookshop

I admit it, I’m a bibliophile. Yes, I’m a book lover. And by that I mean I love the “paper-hold-in-your-hand-and-turn-pages” type book, not the ebooks … I’ve never really got into those. Anyway being a book lover, when I went on a holiday to the Gold Coast recently, I decided to suss out all the secondhand bookstores that were nearby, as you do, right? And boy did I find the best secondhand bookshop ever!! It was seriously jaw-dropping. “Antique and Collectors Books” is the name of the place, and it’s at Southport, just north of Surfers Paradise. The spiel about the store says … “Situated in Australia’s premier tourist area – the Gold Coast – our shop stocks over 100,000 books ranging from antiquarian to modern day literature. We specialise in “out of print” and antiquarian books and have 24 years experience in bookselling.” I don’t really need to say much about it as the photos below tell the story. [Click on each for a larger picture.] But I was than I was truly in heaven, and could have spent a whole day there. I think they must have every topic imaginable, including a section on genealogy (I was impressed). I should also mention that Antique and Collectors Books is a two storey place … I know, it just got better, eh? Anyway despite the size of the place, everything was very well labelled, so finding various categories/topics was quite easy, and that’s truly a credit to the store managing the vast number of books that they do. And for those that are wondering, yes Mr Lonetester and I did find a heap of books, and so as to not exceed our luggage allowance on the plane, we actually...

17 Websites to Find Photos for Your Blog...

From time to time I write a non-genealogy related post. One more general. This is one of those. But all of the links listed below are useful for not just regular bloggers, but they can certainly be used for those who are geneablogging as well. I have always believed that graphics in blog posts are important. And when you read the “what makes a good blog post” type articles, photographs and images always seem to get a mention, so I’m not the only one. Over the years I have been asked where do you get the images that I use on my blog, and the simple answer is I use BigStock which you do have to pay for, but it is low-cost compared to some. But there are other valuable resources out there that you can use, so I thought I’d introduce you to some of them. Many are free free stock photo sites, with a few pay stock photo sites listed as well. It kind of goes without saying that you MUST read the terms of use on each site, because each is different. Some are free without any attribution needed, some require attribution. Some allow you to alter the image, and others don’t. Some are available for personal use only, but not commercial. Others are fine for either use. So be aware, read the licence. ———————————————– BigStock – $ www.bigstockphoto.com BigStock (formerly BigStockPhoto) offers users over 35 million royalty-free photographs and images. They are available to download in various sizes and various file formats, and are available for individuals and commercial organisations. BigStock is a pay site, and you can pay per month, or buy credits. I use the credit method, and just purchase a batch of...

In May’s Gone By …...

Believe it or not May is here. Which means that June is almost here. Which means the middle of the year. Already! But we won’t dwell on that. Apart from a couple of birthday’s, and Mother’s Day of course, May is a pretty quiet month for me. So I thought I’d take a look back through the history books and see happened in May … and as you’ll see there’s a heap a fascinating events that occurred during May. 1770 (17 May) – Lieutenant James Cook discovers and names Queenland’s Glass House Mountains 1813 (11 May) – Lawson, Blaxland and Wentworth set out to cross the Blue Mountains in Australia’s first major exploration venture 1829 (2 May) – The city of Fremantle, Western Australia, is founded as Captain Fremantle hoists the Union Jack 1837 (23 May) – Streets and squares in Adelaide, capital of South Australia, are first named 1838 (24 May) – The first in what was to become a chain of David Jones Department stores opens 1840 (22 May) – New South Wales ceases to be a convict colony as the Order-in-Council ending transportation of convicts is issued 1852 (4 May) – The Second Gold Escort arrives in Adelaide, returning wealth from the Victorian goldfields to the colony of South Australia 1854 (18 May) – Australia’s first horse-drawn railway line commences operations in South Australia 1861 (30 May) – Wills returns to the Dig tree to see whether a rescue party has arrived 1870 (25 Mar) –  Notorious Australian bushranger ‘Captain Thunderbolt’ is shot dead 1884 (31 May) – Kellogg patents the cornflake 1894 (5 May) – The Australian slang term ‘fair dinkum’ appears in print for the first time 1900 (15 May) – Women win the...

Reminiscences of WW2 from My Grandparents – Part 2...

ANZAC Day. A day that Australians and New Zealanders remember of those who went to war. A day to remember those who never made it home. And it is also a day to remember those who were left at home during the war and afterwards. Last week I wrote “Reminiscences of WW2 from My Grandparents – Part 1” which is primarily an interview with my grandparents Evelyn and Cecil Hannaford about their experiences during World War 2. This interview, which was done as a high school project a number of years ago by a friend who interviewed them, is written as a transcript. So this is my grandparents talking about their own experiences during the war, In. THEIR. OWN. WORDS! Not as history books records it, but as they experienced it. As it was a long interview I decided to split it into two, and this is the continuation. Continuation of the interview … What type of weather was it? Mr H. It was winter time. Then when we got up to Trincomalee [Sri Lanka] it was summer time, in the tropics. We were out in the bay and the sister ship, Mary, went out into the harbour and they had all the port holes open, light shining everywhere. We had to have ours shut and it was hot. Did you have enough food? Mrs H. Well, everyone was rationed. What were the ration books like? Mrs H. We were given ration books and you had to have so many coupons for tea and sugar and butter. We weren’t troubled about the butter because we made our own. How did they actually work? Mrs H. We had to go to the shop or on the other hand thee was...

Reminiscences of WW2 from My Grandparents – Part 1...

“Don’t talk about the war to your grandparents”. That’s what I was told. So I didn’t. But fortunately for me (and the rest of my family), someone did. And for that I’m eternally grateful. When a friend was doing a school project on WW2 and needed to interview someone about the war, and didn’t have any reli’s here in Australia who were in the war, she asked my grandparents, Cecil and Evelyn Hannaford (nee Randell). So I have to thank both Cathryn and my grandparents for this, because if she hadn’t asked, I guarantee that these memories would have been lost forever. Before I begin I shall just say that the original interview is quite long, so I won’t include every question, but even so it’s still long enough that I’ll split this over two posts. The introduction … As a brief introduction, at age 25 Cecil Hannaford joined the army in 1940, and was trained at Woodside Army Camp before going aboard in 1941. During his time with the army he travelled to Libya, Palestine, Syria and Egypt. Aged 25 when he signed up, he went away as a driver, but also had to man the anti-aircraft guns at times. My grandma, Evelyn Hannaford (nee Randell) lived at Gumeracha with her family during the war. On their farm they grew vegetables which were needed for the army. The interview … How old were you when World War II was declared? Mrs H. 23 years old. Mr H. 25 years old. In what country were you living in? In what state? Both. Australia, South Australia. Living at Cudlee Creek. Were you living at Cudlee Creek all through the war? Mrs H. I was at Gumeracha during the war. Mr...

Anecdotes, BDMs, Obits and Adverts – What Are These Records?...

I have come across an incredible source of information relevant to my research. One that includes local town news choc full of anecdotes relating to the locals, mentions of births, deaths, marriages and obituaries, and a heap of adverts from the local area. So just what are these records? Church Journals! Really? You bet. Let me give you some examples. Here is a page from the “Local News” section (also called “Editorial Notes”, “Miscellaneous” or “Church News” in various editions) … So you’ll see from this one page of Local News we learn of several people’s  health troubles, several people moving, the introduction of some of the new equipment in the district, election chances, local meetings, a new business venture, a prize a local business won, and a bunch more. And that’s just a page from ONE journal! You’ll also find some marriage and death notices (sorry no births afterall. But how do you write BDMs without births? DMs just doesn’t make sense) … And of course the obituaries which are just awesome! As well as anniversaries … And other newsworthy events, like town sports news and this brave deed! There’s also general history on the church, town and pioneers … And if all that wasn’t fabulous enough, then there’s the adverts. Many from local businesses – others from Adelaide. Here’s just a few examples of them. So you see, there is potentially so much you can find in Church Journals. And while my family were heavily involved in the church scene, many other researchers would say their family wasn’t, so wouldn’t think to look in Church Journals. So I hope this has opened your eyes to the possibilities of what could be out there. If you are fortunate...

Trove Tuesday: Gumeracha’s Annual Ploughing Match in 1860...

Oh how times have changed. I must say that the thought of going to a ploughing match really doesn’t excite me, but obviously it was a different time back in the mid-1800s when Gumeracha’s Annual Ploughing Match held, and it was certainly something to look forward to, as it brought out the whole town plus more! Browsing on Trove certainly brings up a bunch of articles relating to Gumeracha’s Annual Ploughing Match. This seems to have started in 1850 or there abouts, and continued at least until the 1890s. Anyway I’ve chosen to share the one from the South Australian Weekly Chronicle, dated 11 August 1860. As the article mentions it was held on land owned by William Beavis Randell, near the Gumeracha Mill (now Randell’s Mill B&B), and over 600 people attended! Even the Gumeracha Rifle Volunteers were there, and went through their drill. It must have been quite an event. There were 9 men competing, and 8 boys, and they were … And the winners were … The article is a long one, and goes on to discuss the dinner and speeches that were held afterwards. If you wish to read the full article you can find it here. After reading the article, I must say I’ve changed my mind, and I’d love to see what a ploughing match is like. But I mean one back then, not one now. It was truly a different way of life back...

Just Playing Along …...

When I got home from work today and logged on to Facebook, I noticed that my feed was full of 5 generation colour charts. Wondering what all this was, I discovered that my geniemate J. Paul Hawthorne started the trend by posting a picture of his chart saying … “A little visual I created in Excel. 5 Generation chart of my direct ancestors birth state — starting with me. A good way to visualize migration patterns.” Obviously this piqued everyone’s interest, as they decided to play along too – as did I. Creating a chart in Excel that covers 5 generations (starting with yourself), and then putting the birthplace (state or country) in each box for your ancestors, colouring each place a different colour. It does make for interesting viewing. Here’s mine … Go ahead, do yours. You’ll find it really...

Facebook and Genealogy: 151 More Links for Australian Researchers...

The link between Facebook and genealogy just seems to keep getting stronger, with more groups, societies, history pages and so on popping up all the time. It really is THE way to keep up to date with numerous places these days. Afterall you can join a group for the area you are researching, and post queries to it. Follow a page for the town your ancestors came from and see what it was like “in the olden days”. Reminisce what life was like when you were young. Follow various state archives and societies to keep up with their latest news … and more. Back in late 2012 I created a list of 100 Facebook links for Australian researchers, and since then I have created a list with 54 links for local history. Things change quickly online, so it seemed that it was timely to create another list with even more Facebook links for Australian researchers. Grouped by Australia, Australian state, and then topics, hopefully this makes it easier for you to find groups and/or pages you might wish to follow. Please note I don’t claim that this is all the groups/pages out there for Australian researchers. In fact it’s far from it, as I know for a fact there are plenty more. But it is a good list, and hopefully you find this (and my earlier lists) useful. == AUSTRALIA == Aussie & UK Angels – Reuniting lost family https://www.facebook.com/groups/1669732293272781/ Aussie Help for all Genealogy https://www.facebook.com/groups/1424411964495247/ Australia Genealogy Research https://www.facebook.com/AustraliaGenealogy/ Australia Old Pioneer Photos https://www.facebook.com/groups/australiaoldpioneerphotos/ Australia Remember When https://www.facebook.com/AustraliaRememberWhen/ Australian Family History and Genealogy https://www.facebook.com/groups/141114082690049/ Australian Historic Photographers for Genealogical Research https://www.facebook.com/groups/1447633032180173/ Australian History Bloggers Fan Page https://www.facebook.com/groups/AussieHistoryBloggers/ British-Australian Ancestry https://www.facebook.com/groups/1691451644416442/ Genealogy ~ Resources ~ Help https://www.facebook.com/FamilyHistoryResousesHelp/ Genealogy My Ancestors Came to Australia https://www.facebook.com/groups/107640276041406/ Old Service Station Photographs – Australia https://www.facebook.com/groups/567854296691889/ Random Acts of Genealogical Kindness – RAOGK Australia https://www.facebook.com/groups/169770909883489/ Using DNA for Genealogy – Australia & NZ https://www.facebook.com/groups/400009620157960/ Vintage Memories-Australia through time https://www.facebook.com/groups/old.australiana.album/ Vintage Rural Australia https://www.facebook.com/Vintage-Rural-Australia-839951842687685/   ==...

My “Spirit of Anzac” Centenary Experience...

The “Spirit of Anzac” Centenary Experience arrived in Adelaide, and what an experience it was. The exhibition gives viewers a “once-in-a-lifetime” opportunity to walk through various recreated World War 1 environments (via sound, audio, images, and in some cases figurines on sets) featuring more than 200 artefacts. You walk through “rooms” at your own pace, and are given stories and details of the various events and campaign via the audio headphones that you are given at the beginning of the tour. Generally it takes attendees anywhere from 1-2 hours to makes their way through. There really is a lot to see. This travelling exhibition which is transported from place-to-place on 10 semitrailers has been on the road since September 2015, and has already visited Albury/Wodonga, Launceston, Hobart, Ballarat, Bendigo, Wollongong, and Melbourne. With Adelaide only having a few more days left. After Adelaide the tour heads to: Tamworth – Apr/May 2016 Toowoomba – May 2016 Brisbane – Jun 2016 Mackay – Jul 2016 Cairns – Aug 2016 Townsville – Sep 2016 Darwin – Oct 2016 Port Augusta – Nov 2016 Perth – Nov/Dec 2016 Bunbury – Jan 2017 Kalgoorlie – Jan/Feb 2017 Geelong – Feb 2017 Orange – Mar 2017 Newcastle – Mar 2017 Sydney – Apr 2017 Entry is free, but bookings are required, and you can do so on their Spirit of Anzac website www.spiritofanzac.gov.au. First, here’s a short behind-the-scene video of the Spirit of Anzac Centenary Experience, which will give you an idea of the work that’s gone into creating this exhibition. And here’s just a few photos from my visit today … If you get a chance, go and see it. It will give you more of an understanding on what our ancestors went through....