Hit By Two Cars, Neither Drivers Stopped...

Tuesday … so it’s Trove Tuesday time. And again Trove has come up with an amazing tid-bit relating to my family. Ok, technically it’s Mr Lonetester’s family, but you get the point. And again it’s something I never would have thought of (of known about) if it wasn’t for the wonders of Trove. I will admit I haven’t done a whole lot of research on this side of the family, so am still learning a lot as I go, however I do know that Richard John Tester survived this accident and lived on for another 20 odd years, and is buried in the Warrnambool Cemetery in Victoria,...

Trewartha’s Candy Store, Dover, New Jersey...

My regular readers will know that my 4x great grandma Charlotte Phillips and her husband Samuel Trewartha are two of my fav ancestors, and I’ve written about them from time to time. Born in the 1820s, they grew up in Cornwall, England and in the English 1861 census Samuel Trewartha’s occupation was given as Copper Miner, while Charlotte’s was Confectioner. This is followed by an entry in the 1866 Directory for Redruth (England) where Samuel is listed as a Sugar Boiler, so obviously they were making candy to supplement his income from mining. It was in 1867 that they made the lifechanging decision to move from England to the United States, ending up in Rockaway and Dover, Morris County, New Jersey, and they opened a candy store there … which from what I can tell was a wonderful store, with an incredible reputation and ran for at least several generations, with her son John and his wife Minnie running it in her later year, and I believe some granddaughters did after that, with Black Rock Candy being their signature treat. While I know a fair bit about Charlotte’s life from records, one thing I didn’t have is any photos of Samuel,  Charlotte, the candy store. That is, at least until cousin bait worked, and some distant relatives saw my previous posts, and have sent me some photos, and have kindly allowed me to share them with you here. So I must say a HUGE, HUGE thank you to Glenn Rush who sent me the photos below, and has allowed me to share them with you. And also to Eric Bullfinch who has sent me a map showing the exact location of the store in Sussex Street, Dover.   So...

Happy 100th Birthday to my Grandma...

Evelyn Phebe Randell was born on 24 June 1916 in “Caringa Private Hospital”, the first hospital in the small town of Gumeracha in the Adelaide Hills. She was born in the town, grew up living in the town, went to the local school, and married at Salem Baptist Church in Gumeracha too, and is buried there too. Known as Ev to some, Lyn to others, Evelyn was my grandma. Although she is no longer with us, having died a few years ago, I am remembering her on this day that would have been her 100th birthday. When I was young, the apple orchards, and her place at Cudlee Creek were my second home. So I have a lot of memories from that era. The daily morning and afternoon teas with Sao biscuits, the picnics on the side of the road, rock buns and jelly cakes, roast dinners, the old oven, the pantry, the outdoor loo, the small knife that was permanently in her bag to cut up a burger from McDonalds in half, the birds, the washhouse, her aprons, how she used a cup and saucer (rather than a mug), and the garden … oh she so loved her garden!! She would elbow my grandpa to wake him up during church, she would comment on what people wore, and the way she and my grandpa would sit in the car in their driveway on a Sunday afternoon, if it was cold but sunny. I remember how she got hooked on watching both Home and Away, and Punky Brewster, and was quite upset when it was taken off, even writing to the TV station. When she wasn’t cooking, cleaning or in her garden, she was crafting – taking up knitting,...

I am NextGen … Are You?...

I hate to say it, but there is a stereotype genealogist. They are more often than not female, and are generally in their 60s. And no I didn’t make that up, it is based on actual stats. But (yes, there is a but) … what I find awesome is that it really is changing, as the age of researchers is coming down because younger people are getting interested. And as younger people get interested they are creating communities for themselves to mix with other young genealogists, which then encourages others. So I just wanted to let others know about the NextGen Genealogy Network. I’m excited to have just joined, and I’m hoping that others (not just in Australia, but around the world)  will join up too. It is a group for 18-50 year olds, to use the powers of social media and the internet to mix with other  young genies, so they don’t have to feel that they are going it alone. Their website says the following … NGGN was founded in 2013 following a Twitter conversation between Jen Baldwin, Kassie Nelson, and D. Joshua Taylor, who wanted to create a community for other young genealogists. Additional collaboration from Shannon Combs Bennett, Tara Cajacob, Wendy Callahan, Melanie Frick, Barry Kline, and other volunteers turned this vision into reality. As young genealogists ourselves, we know how hard it can be to meet peers who share our interests and to find our place within the genealogy community. We want everyone to experience the incredible benefits of enrichment and encouragement that being a part of and contributing to a vibrant and active community can offer. Awesome work on their part to take an idea and make it happen. And I hope that through the power of social media and...

Discovering Links: 21 FREE Links for Irish Genealogy and History...

In this “Discovering Links” post, we take a look at some links that relate to Ireland. You can see my previous Discovering Links posts here. These posts consist of a collection of links that I have discovered, or found useful, and want to share with others. But rather than simply giving you a whole batch of random links each time, I am grouping them by topic, country or Australian state. For this one I’ve decided to share my Irish links (together with a few covering specific counties). It is not intended to be an exhaustive collection of links (not by a long, long way), but they are simply some, that some may find useful, and may not have known about. And while many people think that genealogy costs a lot of money, let me tell you that all of the links below are free. Personally I find that it’s often a matter of knowing where to look beyond the big-name websites, and hopefully this will help with that. === IRELAND GENERAL === IRISH ALMANACS AND DIRECTORIES This site is the work of Peter Clarke, whose aim is to “build the biggest index of freely available ebooks on Irish history, biography and genealogy!” IRISH GRAVESTONE RECORDS This site currently features 70,000 free Irish gravestone records coming from hundreds of Irish graveyards, spanning all 32 counties, and compiled and transcribed by Dr. Jane Lyons and exclusive to From-Ireland.net. In addition, they have links to gravestone photographs, and complete transcriptions as well. IRELAND ON THE FAMILYSEARCH WIKI The FamilySearch Wiki is a powerful learning tool that everyone researching Ireland history and genealogy should use. IRISH MILITARY ARCHIVES The Military Archives has been the official place of deposit for records of the Irish...

One More Picture Added to the Wall...

Some of you may remember that about three years ago I decided to create my Family Tree Photo Wall. This started as a result of having a bunch of family photos, and deciding to put them in an order that made sense to anyone looking it. So I chose to do a butterfly (also known as bow-tie) style tree going direct line back five generations on both mine and Mr Lonetester’s sides of the family. Out of a possible 62 photos (31 on each side of the family), there were only 10 that I was missing photos for … so that wasn’t too bad. However I had an exciting day, as today I was able to add one more photo in – one of my great great grandma Hedvig/Hedvik Karolina Winblad/Vinblad. Born in Mäntsälä in Finland in 1856, she married my great great grandpa Otto Edvard Winter in 1875, and they had six children, my great grandpa (Otto Rafael Winter being their third). Hedvig Karolina Winter died in Helsinki, Finland in 1934, and I was fortunate enough to visit the Helsinki Cemetery in 2015, and saw her’s a few other family members graves. As for my Family Tree Photo Wall, I have no doubt that in time I’ll fill a few more of the nine photo gaps that I still don’t have. Maybe not all … but some. If you’d like to see the process I took to create my Photo Wall, have a look at my earlier posts: Family Tree Photo Wall Part 1: Getting Started Family Tree Photo Wall Part 2: Almost...

Heaven in a Bookshop

I admit it, I’m a bibliophile. Yes, I’m a book lover. And by that I mean I love the “paper-hold-in-your-hand-and-turn-pages” type book, not the ebooks … I’ve never really got into those. Anyway being a book lover, when I went on a holiday to the Gold Coast recently, I decided to suss out all the secondhand bookstores that were nearby, as you do, right? And boy did I find the best secondhand bookshop ever!! It was seriously jaw-dropping. “Antique and Collectors Books” is the name of the place, and it’s at Southport, just north of Surfers Paradise. The spiel about the store says … “Situated in Australia’s premier tourist area – the Gold Coast – our shop stocks over 100,000 books ranging from antiquarian to modern day literature. We specialise in “out of print” and antiquarian books and have 24 years experience in bookselling.” I don’t really need to say much about it as the photos below tell the story. [Click on each for a larger picture.] But I was than I was truly in heaven, and could have spent a whole day there. I think they must have every topic imaginable, including a section on genealogy (I was impressed). I should also mention that Antique and Collectors Books is a two storey place … I know, it just got better, eh? Anyway despite the size of the place, everything was very well labelled, so finding various categories/topics was quite easy, and that’s truly a credit to the store managing the vast number of books that they do. And for those that are wondering, yes Mr Lonetester and I did find a heap of books, and so as to not exceed our luggage allowance on the plane, we actually...

17 Websites to Find Photos for Your Blog...

From time to time I write a non-genealogy related post. One more general. This is one of those. But all of the links listed below are useful for not just regular bloggers, but they can certainly be used for those who are geneablogging as well. I have always believed that graphics in blog posts are important. And when you read the “what makes a good blog post” type articles, photographs and images always seem to get a mention, so I’m not the only one. Over the years I have been asked where do you get the images that I use on my blog, and the simple answer is I use BigStock which you do have to pay for, but it is low-cost compared to some. But there are other valuable resources out there that you can use, so I thought I’d introduce you to some of them. Many are free free stock photo sites, with a few pay stock photo sites listed as well. It kind of goes without saying that you MUST read the terms of use on each site, because each is different. Some are free without any attribution needed, some require attribution. Some allow you to alter the image, and others don’t. Some are available for personal use only, but not commercial. Others are fine for either use. So be aware, read the licence. ———————————————– BigStock – $ www.bigstockphoto.com BigStock (formerly BigStockPhoto) offers users over 35 million royalty-free photographs and images. They are available to download in various sizes and various file formats, and are available for individuals and commercial organisations. BigStock is a pay site, and you can pay per month, or buy credits. I use the credit method, and just purchase a batch of...

In May’s Gone By …...

Believe it or not May is here. Which means that June is almost here. Which means the middle of the year. Already! But we won’t dwell on that. Apart from a couple of birthday’s, and Mother’s Day of course, May is a pretty quiet month for me. So I thought I’d take a look back through the history books and see happened in May … and as you’ll see there’s a heap a fascinating events that occurred during May. 1770 (17 May) – Lieutenant James Cook discovers and names Queenland’s Glass House Mountains 1813 (11 May) – Lawson, Blaxland and Wentworth set out to cross the Blue Mountains in Australia’s first major exploration venture 1829 (2 May) – The city of Fremantle, Western Australia, is founded as Captain Fremantle hoists the Union Jack 1837 (23 May) – Streets and squares in Adelaide, capital of South Australia, are first named 1838 (24 May) – The first in what was to become a chain of David Jones Department stores opens 1840 (22 May) – New South Wales ceases to be a convict colony as the Order-in-Council ending transportation of convicts is issued 1852 (4 May) – The Second Gold Escort arrives in Adelaide, returning wealth from the Victorian goldfields to the colony of South Australia 1854 (18 May) – Australia’s first horse-drawn railway line commences operations in South Australia 1861 (30 May) – Wills returns to the Dig tree to see whether a rescue party has arrived 1870 (25 Mar) –  Notorious Australian bushranger ‘Captain Thunderbolt’ is shot dead 1884 (31 May) – Kellogg patents the cornflake 1894 (5 May) – The Australian slang term ‘fair dinkum’ appears in print for the first time 1900 (15 May) – Women win the...

Reminiscences of WW2 from My Grandparents – Part 2...

ANZAC Day. A day that Australians and New Zealanders remember of those who went to war. A day to remember those who never made it home. And it is also a day to remember those who were left at home during the war and afterwards. Last week I wrote “Reminiscences of WW2 from My Grandparents – Part 1” which is primarily an interview with my grandparents Evelyn and Cecil Hannaford about their experiences during World War 2. This interview, which was done as a high school project a number of years ago by a friend who interviewed them, is written as a transcript. So this is my grandparents talking about their own experiences during the war, In. THEIR. OWN. WORDS! Not as history books records it, but as they experienced it. As it was a long interview I decided to split it into two, and this is the continuation. Continuation of the interview … What type of weather was it? Mr H. It was winter time. Then when we got up to Trincomalee [Sri Lanka] it was summer time, in the tropics. We were out in the bay and the sister ship, Mary, went out into the harbour and they had all the port holes open, light shining everywhere. We had to have ours shut and it was hot. Did you have enough food? Mrs H. Well, everyone was rationed. What were the ration books like? Mrs H. We were given ration books and you had to have so many coupons for tea and sugar and butter. We weren’t troubled about the butter because we made our own. How did they actually work? Mrs H. We had to go to the shop or on the other hand thee was...