Family History Through the Alphabet Challenge: H is for Happy Dance

Family History Through the Alphabet Challenge: H is for Happy Dance

Continuing on in the Family History Through the Alphabet Challenge, I’ve chosenĀ  to write about the Genealogy Happy Dance.

H is for Happy Dance

The Genealogy Happy Dance is something that every genealogist lives for, and will get to experience it sometime throughout their research life. Though the when, where, and how often varies from person to person, as it is rather unpredictable.

The occurrence:
The Genealogy Happy Dance is the dance that occurs when you’ve hit the jackpot so to speak, also known as ‘genealogy gold’. You know, it’s that that one piece of information that you’ve been looking for, for over 10 years, and now you have it right there in front of you. It’s the piece of information that proves that YOUR Edward Smith was the one that emigrated in 1830 to Australia, or that Mary Ellen Teller was the illegitimate daughter of the Sir William Teller from Yorkshire, and so on. It’s the piece that makes the rest fit. You’re never quite sure when the Happy Dance will happen as it can be days, week and years between them – but when you find that right piece of ‘gold’ it can keep you dancing for ages.

The place:
The place on where the Genealogy Happy Dance occurs can vary, as it depends on where you are researching at the time. It might be in your home, it might be at your local genealogy society or archives, it might be when you visit you your great aunt Susan for the first time. Wherever it occurs, don’t be ashamed of getting up and dancing. Let others know your excitement.

The action:
I’m sure everyone that is reading this is familiar enough with the Genealogy Happy Dance – but just in the off chance someone isn’t, let me explain. Once you’ve hit gold with your research you’re likely to jump up out of your chair, with arms flailing everywhere and then start dancing. Meanwhile you are also likely to start pointing to the screen (if you’re at a computer), or document (if at an archives) and repeat the phrase “I’ve found him, I’ve found him” over and over. And the biggest giveaway is that you’ll have the biggest smile on your face which can last for days or weeks. If you are out in public when this occurs, yes others will look – and many will offer you a congratulations. If you’re at home, you will race to tell your long suffering non-genie spouse the exciting news, to with they will reply “that’s nice dear”, but offer no other support or join in on your excitement. So then it’s time to jump online and tell your genealogy buddies there the super-duper exciting news. They understand just how exciting it really is, and will share in your excitement.

So it’s on with the research, and here’s hoping the next Happy Dance isn’t too far away.

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4 Responses to “Family History Through the Alphabet Challenge: H is for Happy Dance”

  1. Fi says:

    Oh yes! Gotta love the happy dance :)

  2. Sharon says:

    The first time I did the “happy dance” my husband wondered what was wrong. Now he ignores it.

    I wonder if anyone has done the “happy dance” in a quiet library and what the reaction was?

  3. Catherine says:

    What a beauty!!! Yep Alona the “Happy Dance” is a joy and so so addictive :-D
    Thank heavens for our blogs and on-line “genealogy buddies” cos no longer do I need to feel guilty when faced with the glazed eyes, slightly forced smile and quiet murmurs of my lovely children when I’m “happy dancing” yet again. Cheers, Catherine

  4. De Miller says:

    Ah…yes The Jackpot and the Happy Dance. My hubby and children wonder what’s going on with me sometimes!

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